Living Life our Own Way – Authenticity through Conceptlessness

Published: Sep 23, 2022 | Updated: Sep 23, 2022

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Living Life our Own Way - Authenticity through Conceptlessness

Living life our own way is not something one finds. It’s something that expresses and shows itself when all artifice and cunning has been cast off. When that happens, our lives become spontaneous, rather unplanned, simply because the “planning structure” has vanished.

Artifice is all that doesn’t correspond with us. That’s not a mysterious thing. It’s easy to see what doesn’t work in our lives and what makes us unhappy. But then, of course, it’s not so easy to get rid of all that, and moreover — to not keep repeating ingrained actions and patterns.

There are many reasons why people keep on functioning the way they do, and most of those, if not all, finally come down to fear, habit, and/or ignorance, which in their turn are based on the staggering wealth of concepts they’ve adopted as true and truth.

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Living our own, natural way will not necessarily bring us happiness in the traditional sense. Not the happiness we imagine. Our own way foremost brings truth, authenticity, and spontaneity in our lives.

Our own way shows itself when we start to see that the “way we go about” is in fact the way of things happening outside of us — and our conditioned emotional or intellectual reaction to those. It’s rather “their way,” based on internalized cultural, educational, moral, and social notions.

But our own way is rather nurtured from “inside” of us, although it’s hard to formulate what that is exactly, for — other than not leaning on any authority there are no concepts or directives to find “within us” governing our “going about.”

When we look “inside,” we find nothing there. It’s a kind of tabula rasa, a vast emptiness, a total void of words and concepts. It’s total silence, it’s all what is unknown, and it takes enormous courage and a burning urge of “wanting the truth” to trust and live that.

Living our own way of life means acting without predefined concepts, it’s re-acting spontaneously from out our inner void and openness, which is concept-less. It’s total response. Absolute respons-ibility.

When that is and manifests itself, there are no questions arising of what-to-do or what not-to-do, happiness or unhappiness, because we then act naturally, smoothly, very much according to our genuine way of functioning.

And that which functions friction-less, tension-less, and conflict-less cannot other than make us “happy.” Even if it’s a knowledge or a “state-of-affairs” one can never ever experience consciously.


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